Work-Life Balance

When it comes to making career choices, people tend to always say the following: “Find a job you enjoy doing, and you will never have to work a day in your life”. The famous words of Mark Twain may be true, however, this mentality can cause an unhealthy work-life balance.

Work-life balance is the ability to enjoy the four aspects of a person’s life: Family, career, health and friends. And in the current digital age, everything is very fast-paced and employees tend to overwork themselves trying to keep up with the new environment leaving no time for the other three aspects. To avoid burnouts and exhaustion you need to reflect on your working habits and in order to do so, you need to set boundaries.

By prioritising and separating work-related activities from your personal home environment, a so-called work-life balance is created. It is important that the moment your working hours end, you are leaving all of your professional worries and responsibilities at your workplace. Some European countries have already undertaken several legal measures to control excessive working hours. For example, French law permits all employees to ignore their email after work hours and the European Union enforced a maximum 48-hour work week.

In the business field, business travellers face the most difficulties in maintaining a healthy balance since they are away from home for a long time. Being constantly on the road can be stressful since they have less quality time with their families and are surrounded by unfamiliar places and people. Also, in order to kill time during the commute, the travellers are tempted to catch up on their emails. To take matters into your own hands, we have gathered some tips to help you create a healthy work-life balance!

  1. Talk about it

When you notice that you are stressed out because of work and feel powerless, talk about it with people around you. It is not good to bottle up feelings since at some point they will explode. Engage with your colleagues, HR department and ask for advice on how to solve this issue.

  1. Start exercising

A great way to relieve stress is to do some type of physical activity. One of the effective ways would be to join a sport’s team because in this setting you are surrounded by other people and commitment to the game will distract you from your worries. Furthermore, doing physical activity will help you to reset your stressful state. For instance, upbeat exercises which make you sweat and raise your heartbeat will increase your mood, energy and make your mind feel more refreshed. Rhythmic exercises like walking and running will calm down your nerves. Whenever you feel like work is overwhelming you, during your lunch break take a stroll around the block.

  1. Plan

Plan your week ahead and include a window for the things you love doing the most. Having a clear overview of your task can help you think more clearly, however, your goals need to be realistic. When travelling on a business trip, try to schedule a few days either before or after the trip to do some sightseeing. This will be a great escape! A bonus tip, take your family with you on the trip.

  1. Unplug

The moment you leave the office, mentally leave all of your professional responsibilities there. Mute your work email and focus on spending quality time with your loved ones. A tip, never give your personal WhatsApp number as your work number. In this case, you will be getting unofficial work-related phone calls at unexpected moments.

Reflect on your current situation and include these tips to feel more refreshed!

 

By Polina Zavyalova

 

Sources:

Work-life balance, OECD

Deborah Lee, Forbes

Stress in the workplace, Helpguide

Work-life balance around the world

 

 


Make a Big Impact with a Small Commitment

As a global nomad or a business traveller that is always on the road, it is difficult to find time to maintain a healthy work-life balance and simultaneously give back to the community. Most of the charity projects require quite long-time commitment since the usual duration of projects can vary from 2 and up to 4 weeks of consistent dedication. To avoid the registration hassle and high sign-up fees, consider opportunities for an amazing concept: micro-volunteering.

Micro-volunteering offers opportunities that are cost-free and have little to no commitment. It allows volunteers to contribute to various causes on the spot and there are no commitment boundaries.

The demand for flexible short-term volunteering opportunities is on the rise because more and more people are leading a busy, unpredictable and global-nomadic lifestyle. During your work travels, micro-volunteering would be a great opportunity to explore the neighbourhood, community and culture. It offers great flexibility and a chance to explore various volunteer projects to discover what you like best. A great way to get involved would be volunteering at a local homeless shelter, food bank or any other local community centres. In the Netherlands, there is a platform NL Voor Elkaar which provides various volunteering options that are possible for one time only volunteering experience. The concept of micro-volunteering is known world-wide and there are other platforms that promote various causes such as Speed Volunteer in London or Cause Corps with various short-term volunteering openings all around the world.

What makes this concept even more special, is the fact that it is also possible to help the world online. For instance, an online volunteering act would be online sponsorship, crowdfunding, providing feedback, filling in a survey and much more. It requires minimum effort, however every small contribution matters.

No matter the setting, everyone should explore volunteering opportunities that the world is offering. Remember, each contribution counts and it will definitely make a difference!

Are you planning your next business or leisure trip? Contact Short Stay Citizens and reserve your next accommodation with us! Need additional information about any accommodation location? Contact us and we’ll be glad to help you!

 

By Polina Zavyalova

Sources :

Charlotte Jones, The Guardian

Anna Patton, Mission Box