Are you one of those people that need to relocate because of Brexit? Or have you simply gotten an opportunity to work abroad or elsewhere? How exciting! But now the headache starts. It’s one thing to relocate on your own, but it’s another thing to relocate with your family. Here are some FREE tips that you need to make your relocation smoother.


1. Break it down gently to your kids about the relocation
You and your partner have known for a while about the relocation, it is time to share the news with your children. Relocating to another city or country might not be perceived as a positive opportunity, especially by children in the age between 10 up to 15 who have their friends and roots in their hometown. On the other hand, this adventure could sound exciting for them – going to a new place and exploring a new environment. It is important to let your children know it is not a holiday because this time they will not come back after a few weeks. Try to put a positive spin on this new adventure and explain the benefits they will gain with this relocation.

Your kids will learn way more about a new culture and language and make (more) new friends. Remind them that they will be still able to contact their friends via Skype, Facetime, email via a phone call or other social networking sites. Show the kids the location where they will be living on Google Maps, or any other location map, and try to create the feeling that the family is going on an adventure together. Lastly, involve your kids in all the stages of moving away, especially if they’re grown enough. They’ll appreciate it.

2. Resolve important issues before leaving
So, the bomb has dropped and now it is time to solve issues that are still left. Are you and your partner on the same page about the relocation? What can you do both to make it comfortable for all to relocate? Does your partner have to give up his or her job? A suggestion for your working partner is that he or she tries to arrange an agreement with the employer to work remotely.
What about the kids who are halfway through their school year? Will I take them out during the school year, or should they relocate once school is over? Also, searching for information about different (international) schools with similarities in your kids’ current school curriculum will prevent your kids from falling behind in their studies.

3. Checklist for the move

Now that the kids are up to speed and important issues are resolved, it’s time to get things rolling by making a checklist! Ask yourself what are the things that need to be resolved for the move itself? Which organisations need to have your new address? What do I need to move? Speed up your packing and save time by setting up different boxes with each their own purpose: throw away, give to charity, sell, or to keep will help. Furthermore, is the accommodation already provided? Or do I need to get a temporary serviced apartment? See if your new employer could pay your stay in a curated and professional serviced apartment, for the time being – a nice thing of this all it is fully furnished with the needed amenities! Once you have THE family house, make everything revolving around the colour of the wall up to the furniture, a family affair! To make all of you feel home in the new house, having key items from your previous home will help to adjust to this new place.

4. Cross-cultural awareness
Don’t end up standing in a windstorm! Coming from sunny California for example and moving to Sweden could be a big shock for all of us. So be aware, online information will only get you that far. Try to connect with locals or expats in that neighbourhood through forums or Facebook groups before leaving. This could help you to settle in faster and help you get acquainted with locals and the surroundings. Also, if you’re moving to a country with another language, get a book or an app to learn the basics of the language. It’s a fun exercise for you and your family!

5. Plan your goodbyes

Don’t you just hate goodbyes? Especially doing it repeatedly? Here’s an idea! Throw a house cooling party! Invite all your friends and family and say your goodbyes all at once! Also, house cooling parties are an excellent way of getting rid of some stuff that you don’t want to take to your new place. For the kids, arranging other activities with their own friends is a positive idea and on top of that, buy a notebook for the younger kids so they have a place with all the contact information and pictures of their friends. For the older ones, they can still easily connect with their friends through social media and different chat apps.

 

 

 

Last but not least, as a wise person once said:

 

By Santa Alcantara


References

https://www.fidi.org/blog/parents%E2%80%99-guide-moving-abroad-kids

https://www.fidi.org/blog/global-assignments-and-expat-children-advice-parents

https://www.fidi.org/blog/preparing-kids-relocation

https://www.fidi.org/blog/6-tips-expat-office-cultures

https://www.fidi.org/blog/cross-cultural-awareness

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/teen-angst/201512/moving-the-family

https://www.nesgt.com/blog/2017/05/how-to-deal-with-relocating-your-family

http://premierevanlines.com/blog/5-tips-family-relocation

https://squarecowmovers.com/moving-and-packing-101/7-things-to-consider-before-relocating-your-family/

https://www.grace.com.au/relocating-family-work/

https://www.furnishandfinish.com/tips-relocating-family/

https://traveltips.usatoday.com/useful-tips-family-moving-relocating-25892.html

https://www.allied.com/moving-resources/moving-preparation/family-relocation-timeline

https://www.forbes.com/sites/jacquelynsmith/2012/06/21/is-relocating-for-a-job-the-right-decision-for-you/#21b4a3136e7f

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1002/job.4030110507